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Almasi Arts Alliance is a nonprofit organization that strives to bring the African dramatic voice to the world by creating and facilitating artistic collaborations between African artists and American artists and artistic institutions. It is our goal to usher into fruition the next generation of African Dramatic Artists, through training, mentorship and access so as to allow the African story to be universally received.

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tagline

Almasi Arts Alliance is a nonprofit organization that strives to bring the African dramatic voice to the world by creating and facilitating artistic collaborations between African artists and American artists and artistic institutions. It is our goal to usher into fruition the next generation of African Dramatic Artists, through training, mentorship and access so as to allow the African story to be universally received.

LEARN MORE

tagline

Almasi Arts Alliance is a nonprofit organization that strives to bring the African dramatic voice to the world by creating and facilitating artistic collaborations between African artists and American artists and artistic institutions. It is our goal to usher into fruition the next generation of African Dramatic Artists, through training, mentorship and access so as to allow the African story to be universally received.

LEARN MORE

tagline

Almasi Arts Alliance is a nonprofit organization that strives to bring the African dramatic voice to the world by creating and facilitating artistic collaborations between African artists and American artists and artistic institutions. It is our goal to usher into fruition the next generation of African Dramatic Artists, through training, mentorship and access so as to allow the African story to be universally received.

LEARN MORE

tagline

Almasi Arts Alliance is a nonprofit organization that strives to bring the African dramatic voice to the world by creating and facilitating artistic collaborations between African artists and American artists and artistic institutions. It is our goal to usher into fruition the next generation of African Dramatic Artists, through training, mentorship and access so as to allow the African story to be universally received.

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ALMASI BLOG

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ALMASI PROJECTS

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ALMASI FELLOWSHIPS

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SPONSOR A DREAM

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FELLOWSHIPS & GRANTS

Almasi Alliance Fellowships and Grants are designed to facilitate the cultural exchange between Dramatic Artists in Zimbabwe and Dramatic Artists in the United States of America. These grants will provide substantial support for the artists and the cultural exchanges allowing the artists to develop both professionally and artistically. By providing opportunities for professional development and by best meeting the artists’ needs, these fellowships and grants aim to give the artist an opportunity to hone their craft, to focus on their art form and to release their unique artistic voice into the larger global community with skill.

TRAINING EXCHANGES

Almasi Arts Alliance facilitates a number of exchanges per year that creates African and American artistic collaboration and gives African artists educational and professional opportunities in their craft. The Artistic Training Exchange is at the core of Almasi’s pillar of collaboration and principle of education. We wish to bring experts in various components of the dramatic arts from the United States to train, mentor and educate our Zimbabwean dramatic artists. Our goal is to professionalize the Zimbabwean dramatic arts sector and bring deeply needed and desired education to talented but untrained Zimbabwean artists.

I Learned to Quiet My Fears

Harare, August 5th 2017 | Elizabeth Zaza Muchemwa

Directing the staged reading of Widows was a satisfactory process for me. My understanding of the play grew the more time I spent in the rehearsal room, seeing the play in the actors’ eyes as they engaged with the theme and issues dealt with in the play. Choosing to work on Widows was not an easy decision to make. In this multi-layered dramatic piece whose issues are as universal as they are specific to a particular part of the world, I worried about the possibilities of leaning too close to the experience of others in my community especially in the post reading discussions and whether I was equipped with the skills on how to navigate such a delicate terrain. However, with each rehearsal day, as the actors shared ideas and new discoveries were made, I learned to quiet my fears. What struck me the most about Widows was Sofia’s strength and the collective power the women found in speaking with one voice in a society that was ruled by brute force. Using symbolism and representation, the playwright unpacks war, exile, inequality, militarism, and totalitarianism. And through this effort enabled the play to speak of brutalized childhood, the endlessness of time, the uneasy relationship people have with peace post a brutal conflict and the cyclical nature of injustice when not addressed. While the play tells one about human suffering and the dehumanization of a society by war, it serves as a beacon of hope for people still living in societies governed by fear.
 
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Give Us Space!

Harare, March 19th 2017 | Gideon Jeph Wabvuta

The story of Mbare dreams began two years ago when Robert Egan came to Zimbabwe to conduct the first ever Almasi African Playwrights Festival (AAPF). Little did I know that two years later I would be performing my original play in Albuquerque New Mexico at the Revolutions festival. I didn’t think much of it when Juli Hendren, the Artistic Director of the Revolutions Festival, approached me and expressed interest in me participating in the festival this year. However, a few months after our meeting, Juli emailed me again to my surprise, and thus the real conversation to bring Mbare Dreams to the festival began. Robert Egan, my director, was roped in and in no time we were at work rewriting the show, readying it for the festival. It was a struggle to say the least to be back onstage as for the past two years I had been focusing on just writing and directing. The pressures of grad school didn’t make it any easier but we pushed on. Monday the 13th of March, we landed in Albuquerque and went straight to rehearsal. That became the routine, rehearsal from 10am to 5pm, then home, where I would take a brief rest only to resume rehearsal the next day. I can safely say it was one of the toughest jobs I have ever done. The support I had from my director Robert Egan, Michelle Joyner, the wonderful staff at Revolution, Kevin, Eddie, Star, Alexis, Barbara, all of them were a constant support throughout these three days. It would be a lie to say I didn’t question my abilities whilst going through this process because I did, as day and night I was destroyed both physically and emotionally.
 
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TRAINING EXCHANGES

Almasi Arts Alliance facilitates a number of exchanges per year that creates African and American artistic collaboration and gives African artists educational and professional opportunities in their craft. The Artistic Training Exchange is at the core of Almasi’s pillar of collaboration and principle of education. We wish to bring experts in various components of the dramatic arts from the United States to train, mentor and educate our Zimbabwean dramatic artists. Our goal is to professionalize the Zimbabwean dramatic arts sector and bring deeply needed and desired education to talented but untrained Zimbabwean artists.

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